FAQ's

With the tremendous increase in internet usage over the past several years job hunting has gradually moved online. The problem is that many resources available for job hunters are outdated and do not address the questions people have about online job hunting in particular. Here are answers to some very common questions people have asked in this area.

• What are the benefits to an online job search?

• How should you begin an online job search?

• Are all job search sites expensive?

• Is it limiting to search/recruit by location?

• Can Twitter aide an online job search?

• How does Facebook affect an online job search?

• Should snail mail or email be used in a job search?

• How should you write thank you notes?

• What are the benefits to an online job search?

The first benefit being the sheer number of resources available. You can use job search engines and find available jobs anywhere in the country and even internationally. It is also easier to keep your hunt private, as you can scan jobs and research companies with less of a chance of a current employer finding out. Finally, you can job hunt while watching T.V. or even from a mobile device, and keep tabs on every resume you send out and every response you receive.

• How should you begin an online job search?

To begin your online job search, begin by researching salaries, requirements, and companies for various positions you would be interested in. Create profiles on job search sites and social media sites, though watch privacy settings if have not given notice to a current employer. Begin using job search engines and online newspaper listings to find some initial positions to consider for application.Make sure you have an up to date resume and a well-crafted cover letter. When you’ve found some attractive leads, it’s time to put yourself out there and apply!

• Are all job search sites expensive?

No. There are a wide variety of job search sites, many which are free to join and free to use. Some sites only charge recruiters, and keep membership free for job seekers. Other sites are free for both parties, and still other sites charge both parties a fee for their services. When it comes to making a choice, it’s important that you first outline your budget, your goals, and the real pros and cons of the site you’re looking at. Try to find a perfect balance between cost and benefits so you end up with the best value for money.

• Is it limiting to search/recruit by location?

Most job seekers and recruiters find it helpful to seek out positions or applicants by location. It ensures that both parties can easily meet for an interview, that both parties are focused in their search, and that neither party will need to make a big adjustment in order to either take the job or absorb the potential employee. Consider beginning your search locally. If you exhaust your local resources, then you can expand your geographic search.

• Can Twitter aide an online job search?

Twitter is another excellent way to meet people in your industry. If you feel you must have an informal Twitter account, hide it as best you can so employers will not find it if they Google your name. Use a professional account to network and spread industry news, tips, and similar information.

• How does Facebook affect an online job search?

Many people just entering the workforce have used their Facebook profiles as a means to showcase their personal lives and they often contain pictures, comments, and postings that you would never show your boss. No matter how secure you think your privacy settings are, they are not secure enough. Just take down anything inappropriate, and use the site to follow companies you are interested in. It is understood this is usually an informal site, so it does not need to be purely professional, but don’t leave anything up that casts you in a negative light.

• Should snail mail or email be used in a job search?

Some online job postings will request you use email or snail mail to submit applications, in other situations, call the HR department to see what is preferred. If you are writing a formal letter of inquiry to a director, snail mail it, it comes across as more professional. If you are emailing the secretary to see if the position is still open, you can email it (but still use formal language).

• How should you write thank you notes?

Always write a thank you note following an interview. Thank you notes are usually best snail mailed, the one exception being if they are time sensitive. If you know a decision will be made by the afternoon following your interview, use email. Otherwise, use snail mail. Again, it appears more professional and helps ensure that the decision makers will take notice of it, as emails are easy to skip over.